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The way to crush the middle class is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation. – Vladimir Lenin

What Did the New York Times Say About Geraldine Ferraro in 1984 When She Was a Young Member of Congress with Three Kids?

Posted by iusbvision on September 5, 2008

Fellow students and friends. If a biased and clearly uninformed journalist or professor ever tries to tell you that there is no left wing elite media bias, please throw this right in their face. This weekend I am going to write several more posts showing you this stuff.

New York Times Editorial on the Pick of Geraldine Ferraro to be Vice-President in 1984:

Where is it written that only senators are qualified to become President? Surely Ronald Reagan does not subscribe to that maxim. Or where is it written that mere representatives aren’t qualified, like Geraldine Ferraro of Queens? Representative Morris Udall, who lost New Hampshire to Jimmy Carter by a hair in 1976, must surely disagree. So must a longtime Michigan Congressman named Gerald Ford. Where is it written that governors and mayors, like Dianne Feinstein of San Francisco, are too local, too provincial? That didn’t stop Richard Nixon from picking Spiro Agnew, a suburban politician who became Governor of Maryland. Remember the main foreign affairs credential of Georgia’s Governor Carter: He was a member of the Trilateral Commission. Presidential candidates have always chosen their running mates for reasons of practical demography, not idealized democracy. One might even say demography is destiny: this candidate was chosen because he could deliver Texas, that one because he personified rectitude, that one because he appealed to the other wing of the party. On occasion, Americans find it necessary to rationalize this rough-and-ready process. What a splendid system, we say to ourselves, that takes little-known men, tests them in high office and permits them to grow into statesmen. This rationale may even be right, but then let it also be fair. Why shouldn’t a little-known woman have the same opportunity to grow? We may even be gradually elevating our standards for choosing Vice Presidential candidates. But that should be done fairly, also. Meanwhile, the indispensable credential for a Woman Who is the same as for a Man Who – one who helps the ticket.

http://select.nytimes.com/search/restricted/article?res=F60714FC395D0C708CDDAE0894DC484D81

Spiro Agnew – A suburban Mayor who later became Governor of a “small state”… sound familiar???

Spiro Agnew had a small insurance business before he became a lawyer. At least Ferraro had some business experience as she served on the board of a couple of communications consulting firms. Ferraro also was active in the party machine.  Hmm lets see what they had to say about Edwards… a lawyer who had no business experience, no executive experience and served less than one term as a Senator when he started running for president and had two small kids at home… just like Obama.

Palin runs a commercial fishing business, was a councilman and a mayor. As a councilman she helped to found her city police department and as mayor Palin oversaw tremendous growth in Wasilla as it became the cross roads of what is likely the two busyest highways in Alaska. So important did Wasilla become as the virtual crossroads of Alaska that a referendum to make Wasilla the capital of Alaska was only narrowly defeated. Palin easily won re-election as mayor.

After her terms as mayor Palin served on government commissions, brought down a corruption ring that had a stranglehold on the state and ended the political careers of many who put self over service. Palin beat an incumbent GOP governor in a primary and a popular former two term Democratic governor in the general election. Palin, while fighting both parties and their machines, got ethics reforms passed, overhauled the tax system so energy companies could no longer game the system, returned money to the taxpayers and achieved the largest state infrastructure improvement in American history, a 40 billion dollar pipeline that was languishing in state government for decades. Palin cut the Alaska budget by 10% and cut her own Governor’s expenses by 80% compared to the previous governor.

Palin held elective office for 5 years before Obama ran for anything and as mayor and governor was not afforded the option to vote “present” 130 times. I see lots of bloggers and journalists drawing an equivalency between Obama’s experience and Palin’s. When the truth is told there is no equivalency.

UPDATE: I pored over the Wasilla city budgets and finances and posted a review of Palin’s preformance as Mayor HERE.

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3 Responses to “What Did the New York Times Say About Geraldine Ferraro in 1984 When She Was a Young Member of Congress with Three Kids?”

  1. Tom said

    This should be sent to every Independent voter you know. We have to get the word out about the corrupt policies this man has followed.

    http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2008/06/27/grim_proving_ground_for_obamas_housing_policy/

  2. […] What Did the New York Times Say About Geraldine Ferraro in 1984 When She Was a Young Member of Congr…. . . and why can’t they say the same about Sarah Palin?Story: New York Times Editorial on the Pick of Geraldine Ferraro to be Vice-President in 1984: Where is it written that only senators are qualified to become President? Surely Ronald Reagan does not subscribe to that maxim. Or where is it written that mere representatives aren’t qualified, like Geraldine Ferraro of Queens? Representative Morris Udall, who lost New Hampshire to Jimmy Carter by a hair in 1976, must surely disagree. So must a longtime Michigan Congressman named Gerald Ford. Where is it written that governors and mayors, like Dianne Feinstein of San Francisco, are too local, too provincial? That didn’t stop Richard Nixon from picking Spiro Agnew, a suburban politician who became Governor of Maryland. Remember the main foreign affairs credential of Georgia’s Governor Carter: He was a member of the Trilateral Commission. Presidential candidates have always chosen their running mates for reasons of practical demography, not idealized democracy. One might even say demography is destiny: this candidate was chosen because he could deliver Texas, that one because he personified rectitude, that one because he appealed to the other wing of the party. On occasion, Americans find it necessary to rationalize this rough-and-ready process. What a splendid system, we say to ourselves, that takes little-known men, tests them in high office and permits them to grow into statesmen. This rationale may even be right, but then let it also be fair. Why shouldn’t a little-known woman have the same opportunity to grow? We may even be gradually elevating our standards for choosing Vice Presidential candidates. But that should be done fairly, also. Meanwhile, the indispensable credential for a Woman Who is the same as for a Man Who – one who helps the ticket.http://select.nytimes.com/search/restricted/article?res=F60714FC395D0C708CDDAE0894DC484D81 […]

  3. […] course when Geraldine Ferraao ran for Vice-President she had young children, but the elite media heaped on the praise, after all she is a […]

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