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The way to crush the middle class is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation. – Vladimir Lenin

Archive for December 5th, 2008

Michigan State University Threatens Student Government Member for Commenting on University Policy – UPDATED!

Posted by iusbvision on December 5, 2008

UPDATE – MSU backs down after FIRE and the ACLU turn up the legal heat. FIRE comments HERE.

Here we go again. IUSB Vision readers know that abuse on campus is one of our pet subjects. Unfortunately there are so many documented cases of abuse such as this on campus that we can only write about a fraction of them.

Via FIRE:

EAST LANSING, Mich., December 4, 2008 A leader of Michigan State University’s student government faces suspension for “spam” after she carefully selected and e-mailed about 8 percent of the school’s faculty members encouraging them to express their views about changes to the freshman orientation and academic calendars. Student Kara Spencer, who faced a disciplinary hearing on Tuesday, has turned to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) for help.

“If e-mailing faculty members with concerns about a university calendar is outside the parameters of acceptable speech at Michigan State, no student should feel safe contacting professors about any relevant matter of concern,” Robert Shibley, FIRE’s Vice President, said. “The difference between Spencer’s message and a typical ‘spam’ e-mail is so obvious that it calls into question MSU’s true motivation for silencing this student.”

On September 4, 2008, MSU’s University Committee on Academic Policy made recommendations challenging the MSU administration’s plans to shorten MSU’s Academic Calendar and Fall Welcome (freshman orientation) schedules, noting that any comments would need to be submitted by September 30. Given the short time frame offered for discussion and the fact that the changes were highly controversial, members of the Associated Students of Michigan State University (ASMSU) and the University Committee on Student Affairs (UCSA) held a meeting on September 11 to tackle the issue. UCSA members, including students, several faculty members, and several MSU administrators, then engaged in a cooperative e-mail discussion about the content and recipients of a coordinated response.

On September 14, Spencer notified the group that she would be sending her version of the group’s response as “an informational email” in her own name. She noted that she had “compiled a database of all faculty on campus” for this purpose. None of the faculty members or administrators involved in the discussion complained about this plan. According to Spencer, on or about September 15, she carefully selected about 391 faculty members out of MSU’s approximately 5,000 faculty, and she e-mailed the 391 faculty members the letter that the group of students, faculty, and administrators had written.

The letter stated concerns about the short amount of time given to the MSU community to consider the changes, “which will greatly affect both faculty and students alike,” and called for “an inclusive dialogue among members of the University community” prior to adoption of the changes. The letter added: “Given the immediacy of the situation, we request that any faculty wishing to be heard on this issue contact their Faculty Council representative or the Provost’s office.”

Of course the spam charge was just the vehicle for trying to punish a student for daring to have the guile to fight a change in university policy. Of course, these are the actions that a good member of the student government is expected to take on behalf of the students. Too many university administrators and faculty consider themselves to be so enlightened they feel perfectly justified to use such Stalinist tactics as FIRE and this publication have pointed out with examples time and time again.

Adam Kissel had this to say:

Threatening a senior member of the student government with suspension for sending noncommercial, relevant e-mails to faculty members is outrageous,” Adam Kissel, Director of FIRE’s Individual Rights Defense Program, said. “As the Supreme Court held in Garrison v. Louisiana,‘speech concerning public affairs … is the essence of self-government’ and ‘debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust, and wide-open.’ MSU is teaching students that they challenge the administration’s plans at their peril.

It never ceases to amaze me how many pointy headed academics and college administrators reigning over their fiefdoms start to behave as if the the First Amendment, civil rights laws, and very often the university’s own policies, simply don’t apply to them. Maybe such things are only for the little people (and where was MSU’s OCR office to stand up for this students rights???).

A word to MSU; I suggest getting legally and ethically correct before FIRE and thier lawyer friends begin to do what they do best.

Posted in Campus Freedom, Indoctrination & Censorship, Chuck Norton | 1 Comment »

Intolerance Gone Wild at UNC…AGAIN: The War on Christmas and America’s Foundations Continue

Posted by iusbvision on December 5, 2008

More intolerance in action on campus. As we have said time and time again, what better way for the progressive secular left to destroy the ideals that our country was founded on than to see to it that students forget it. UNC Is being sued at the moment for religious discrimination by a member of the faculty and judging by the lawyer who has taken the case, David French (who has a near 100% victory rate), it would appear that UNC is going to be paying the piper for its intolerance. I am hoping that Bill O’Reilly has a ball with this one.

 

UNC libraries to forgo Christmas trees

Chapel Hill library chief says staffers complained about the display.

By Eric Ferreri
eric.ferreri@newsobserver.com

CHAPEL HILL For as long as anyone can remember, Christmas trees adorned with lights and ornaments have greeted holiday season visitors to UNC Chapel Hill’s two main libraries.

Not this year.

The trees, which have stood in the lobby areas of Wilson and Davis libraries each December, were kept in storage this year at the behest of Sarah Michalak, the associate provost for university libraries.

Michalak’s decision followed several years of queries and complaints from library employees and patrons bothered by the Christian display, Michalak said this week.

Michalak said that banishing the Christmas displays was not an easy decision but that she asked around to library colleagues at Duke, N.C. State and elsewhere and found no other one where Christmas trees were displayed.

Aside from the fact that a UNC Chapel Hill library is a public facility, Michalak said, libraries are places where information from all corners of the world and all belief systems is offered without judgment. Displaying one particular religion’s symbols is antithetical to that philosophy, she said.

“We strive in our collection to have a wide variety of ideas,” she said. “It doesn’t seem right to celebrate one particular set of customs.”

Michalak, chief librarian for four years, said at least a dozen library employees have complained over the last few years about the display. She hasn’t heard similar criticism from students, though they may have voiced concerns to other library staff.

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/local/story/394604.html

Just to show you how subversive and effective the progressive secular left and the marxist left have been at taking public education and turning it on it’s head; I present to you these declarations from the Founding Fathers of our country and ask if you find it the slightest bit remarkable that one can attain a liberal arts degree from UNC or even Indiana University and have no idea that the Founders had views such as the following.

One of the beautiful boasts of our municipal jurisprudence is that Christianity is a part of the Common Law. There never has been a period in which the Common Law did not recognize Christianity as lying at its foundations. – Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story

Source – Life and Letters of Joseph Story, William W. Story, editor (Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1851), Vol. II, p. 8.

I verily believe that Christianity is necessary to support a civil society and shall ever attend to its institutions and acknowledge its precepts as the pure and natural sources of private and social happiness.  – Justice Joseph Story

Life and Letters of Joseph Story, William W. Story, editor (Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1851), Vol. I, p. 92, March 24, 1801.

The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God. – John Adams

Source – Thomas Jefferson, The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (Washington D. C.: The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), Vol. XIII, p. 292-294. In a letter from John Adams to Thomas Jefferson on June 28, 1813.

The blessing and protection of Heaven are at all times necessary but especially so in times of public distress and danger. The General hopes and trusts that every officer and man will endeavor to live and act as becomes a Christian soldier, defending the dearest rights and liberties of his country. – George Washington

Source – George Washington, The Last Official Address of His Excellency George Washington to the Legislature of the United States (Hartford: Hudson and Goodwin, 1783), p. 12; see also The New Annual Register or General Repository of History, Politics, and Literature, for the Year 1783 (London: G. Robinson, 1784), p. 150.

The Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children under a free government ought to be instructed. No truth is more evident than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people. – Noah Webster

Source – Noah Webster, A Collection of Papers on Political, Literary, and Moral Subjects (New York: Webster and Clark, 1843), p. 291, from his “Reply to a Letter of David McClure on the Subject of the Proper Course of Study in the Girard College, Philadelphia. New Haven, October 25, 1836.”

The Christian religion is the basis, or rather the source, of all genuine freedom in government… I am persuaded that no civil government of a republican form can exist and be durable in which the principles of Christianity have not a controlling influence – Noah Webster

Source – K. Alan Snyder, Defining Noah Webster: Mind and Morals in the Early Republic (New York: University Press of America, 1990), p. 253, to James Madison on October 16, 1829.

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